Contribution guidelines

How to Contribute to the Anaconda Installer (the short version)

  1. I want to contribute to the upstream Anaconda Installer (used in Fedora):
  • open a pull request for the <next Fedora number>-devel branch (f25-devel, etc.)
  • check the Commit Messages section below for how to format your commit messages
  1. I want to contribute to the RHEL Anaconda installer:
  • open a pull request for the <RHEL number>-branch branch (rhel7-branch, etc.)
  • check the Commits for RHEL Branches section below for how to format your commit messages

If you want to contribute a change to both the upstream and RHEL Anaconda then follow both a) and b) separately.

Anaconda Installer Branching Policy (the long version)

The basic premise is that there are the following branches:

  • master
  • unstable
  • <next fedora number>-release
  • <next fedora number>-devel

Master branch never waits for any release-related processes to take place. The spec file will remain there to track dependencies. Master branch is not associated with Fedora Rawhide builds anymore. Its purpose is to function purely as an upstream branch.

The unstable branch is used for making periodic Anaconda releases for Rawhide (or possibly anyone else wanting to taste the cutting edge).

Concerning current RHEL branches, they are too divergent to integrate into this scheme. Thus, commits are merged onto, and builds are done on the RHEL branches. In this case, two pull requests will very likely be needed:

  • one for the rhel<number>-branch
  • one for the master or <fedora number>-devel branch (if the change is not RHEL only)

Releases

For specific Fedora version, the release process is as follows:

  • <next Fedora number>-devel is merged onto <next Fedora number>-release
  • a release commit is made (which bumps version in spec file) & tagged

Concerning Fedora Rawhide, the release process is (very) slightly different:

  • master is merged onto the unstable branch
  • a release commit is made (which bumps version in spec file) & tagged

Concerning the <next Fedora number> branches (which could also be called next stable release if we wanted to decouple our versioning from Fedora in the future):

  • work which goes into the next Fedora goes to <next Fedora number>-devel, which is periodically merged back to master
  • this way we can easily see what was developed in which Fedora timeframe and possibly due to given Fedora testing phase feedback (bugfixes, etc.)
  • stuff we don’t want to go to the next Fedora (too cutting edge, etc.) goes only to master branch
  • commits specific to a given Fedora release (temporary fixes, etc.) go only to the <next Fedora number>-release branch
  • the <next Fedora number>-release branch also contains release commits

Example for the F25 cycle

  • master
  • unstable
  • f25-devel
  • f25-release

This would continue until F25 is released, after which we:

  • drop the f25-devel branch
  • keep f25-release as an inactive record of the f25 cycle
  • branch f26-devel and f26-release from the master branch

This will result in the following branches for the F26 cycle:

  • master
  • unstable
  • f26-devel
  • f26-release

Guidelines for Commits

Commit Messages

The first line should be a succinct description of what the commit does. If your commit is fixing a bug in Red Hat’s bugzilla instance, you should add `` (#123456)`` to the end of the first line of the commit message. The next line should be blank, followed (optionally) by a more in-depth description of your changes. Here’s an example:

Stop kickstart when space check fails

Text mode kickstart behavior was inconsistent, it would allow an installation to continue even though the space check failed. Every other install method stops, letting the user add more space before continuing.

Commits for RHEL Branches

If you are submitting a patch for any rhel-branch, the last line of your commit must identify the bugzilla bug id it fixes, using the Resolves or Related keyword, e.g.: Resolves: rhbz#111111

or

Related: rhbz#1234567

Use Resolves if the patch fixes the core issue which caused the bug. Use Related if the patch fixes an ancillary issue that is related to, but might not actually fix the bug.

Pull Request Review

Please note that there is a minimum review period of 24 hours for any patch. The purpose of this rule is to ensure that all interested parties have an opportunity to review every patch. When posting a patch before or after a holiday break it is important to extend this period as appropriate.

All subsequent changes made to patches must be force-pushed to the PR branch before merging it into the main branch.

Merging examples

Merging the Fedora devel branch back to the master branch

(Fedora 25 is used as an example, don’t forget to use appropriate Fedora version.)

Checkout and pull the master branch:

git checkout master git pull

Merge the Fedora devel branch to the master branch:

git merge --no-ff f25-devel

Push the merge to the remote:

git push origin master

Merging a GitHub pull request

(Fedora 25 is used as an example, don’t forget to use appropriate Fedora version.)

Press the green Merge pull request button on the pull request page.

If the pull request has been opened for:

  • master
  • f25-release
  • rhel7-branch

Then you are done.

If the pull request has been opened for the f25-devel branch, then you also need to merge the f25-devel branch back to master once you merge your pull request (see “Merging the Fedora devel branch back to the master branch” above).

Merging a topic branch manually

(Fedora 25 is used as an example, don’t forget to use appropriate Fedora version.)

Let’s say that there is a topic branch called “fix_foo_with_bar” that should be merged to a given Anaconda non-topic branch.

Checkout the given target branch, pull it and merge your topic branch into it:

git checkout <target branch> git pull git merge --no-ff fix_foo_with_bar

Then push the merge to the remote:

git push origin <target branch>

If the <target branch> was one of:

  • master
  • f25-release
  • rhel7-branch

Then you are done.

If the pull request has been opened for the f25-devel branch, then you also need to merge the f25-devel branch back to master once you merge your pull request (see “Merging the Fedora devel branch back to the master branch” above).